Depression Treatment Category

Five Guidelines for Finding Purpose and Meaning in Life

     Many people struggle with finding meaning and purpose in life.  In the following ideas I offer five guidelines for a person struggling in this way. (1) Assess and then figure out what helps you want to live.  Questions like 'what gets me out of bed each day and gets me going?' are an example of how to examine what there is in life that makes life worth living. (2) Explore general resources that aid a person in achieving what he/she is meant to do with his/her life to make sense out of that life.  Various writers study and then describe issues and concerns in relation to purpose and meaning in life; turning to these writers can provide ideas and direction for this search. (3) Seek out professional resources who can aid in this exploration of purpose and meaning.  This experience might include a therapist who is willing to share ideas about how the therapist has gained his/her own purpose and meaning in life.  Often times this type of search with...

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Depression and Hypnotherapy

An ever increasing number of people suffer from depression in 2014. Generally, doctors believe that depression is mostly biological and they treat the condition with prescribed medication. Unfortunately, medication has side effects that alter your body and your brain in more ways than you can imagine.

Depression can cause you to feel hopeless, pessimistic, tired and low in energy. When you’re depressed you feel like you’re in a dark hole and you can’t see the light outside. This hellish state of being may motivate you to seek relief in any form. Medication is the quickest way and doesn’t involve delving deep within your psyche to uncover the possible source of the darkness.

There are a few studies that show the effectiveness of hypnosis in treating depression by changing the quality of your perspective on life on a subconscious level . Research demonstrates that suggestions to the subconscious mind can transform a negative point of view into a more optimistic,...

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Fitting In

Even as adults, we strive to feel like we fit in somewhere. Whether career wise or with a group of friends, we want to feel included and feel like we matter as individuals. When this is threatened, our defenses can come up and cause conflicts. Seeing others as part of a group and you are not, can make you feel hurt when you are not accepted. You might feel that this is a knock on who you are as a person and that you are simply not “good enough” for who you are. It can be taken as a personal assault on your character and the result can be feelings of sadness, depression and anxiety.

How do you overcome the feeling of not fitting in and being left out? First, recognize that it is not necessarily related to a personal flaw in your character or something that you did. It could be a number of reasons that a group has left you out. They may be a shallow group who have a sense of superiority and only include who they feel meets some standard (whatever that may be). It may be that...

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Helping couples cope with psychological issues surrounding abortion

Written by Dr Dorothy Ojarikri, Chartered Clinical Psychologist and Director of UK Private Psychology.


Making the hugely difficult decision to terminate a pregnancy is a choice that can be life- changing and impact upon people’s perception of self, relationships and society at large for decades to come and perhaps forever. The term ‘choice’ when it comes to the difficult issue of abortion indeed may seem insensitive or inappropriate to individuals and couples who have lived through abortion and feel that the personal circumstances surrounding their pregnancy precluded them from having the unborn child.


My therapeutic work with couples both married and unmarried who have lived through the emotional difficulties that are sometimes related to abortion has highlighted the psychological and relationship dilemmas that couples face. The mandatory counselling session that females in the United Kingdom are required to attend prior to an abortion are usually offered only to t...

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Nutrients That Affect Mental Health

As a therapist,I have clients ask about natural methods for mental health.

The first recorded nutritional experiment is in the Bible in the Book of Daniel. As the story goes, the king of Babylon captured Daniel and his friends during an invasion of Israel. When the king invited them to eat his rich foods and wine, Daniel and his friends declined. They explained that they preferred vegetables, beans and water in accordance with their Jewish dietary restrictions. The king agreed to allow them their diet on a trial basis. Daniel and his friends ate their diet for 10 days. Afterward, the king compared their health to that of his men who had been on the richer diet of heavy meats and wine. The king concluded that Daniel and his friends appeared healthier and were allowed to continue with their diet.

Over the course of time, scientists have continually investigated the effect diet and nutrition have on well-being. By the 20th century, scientists had used nutrition in the treatment of every...

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How Medical Conditions Affect Depression

I often have people ask me if medical m conditions can effect mental health. Certain medical problems are linked to lasting, significant mood disturbances - either the sadness or loss of pleasure typical of depression or the elation or hyperirritability seen in mania. In fact, medical illnesses or medications may be at the root of up to 10% to 15% of all depressions.

Among the best-known culprits are two thyroid hormone imbalances. An excess of thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism) can trigger manic symptoms. Hyperthyroidism occurs in about two and a half million Americans. Hypothyroidism, a condition in which your body produces too little thyroid hormone, often leads to exhaustion and depression. This imbalance affects more than nine million Americans.

Heart disease has also been linked to depression, with up to half of heart attack survivors reporting feeling blue and many having significant depression. Depression can spell trouble for heart patients: It's been linked with slower recov...

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Herbal Medicine and Mental Health

In developing countries, up to 80% of indigenous populations rely on herbs for primary health care needs. In France and Germany, 30 to 40% of all medical doctors -- including psychiatrist -- rely on herbal preparations as their primary medicines in mental health counseling. German physicians, for example, frequently prescribe ginkgo, hawthorn, St. John's wort, horse-chestnut, saw palmetto, echinacea, valerian, ginger, garlic, and cranberry.

In Europe, herbs and herbal products are regulated in a different manner than in the United States. In 1978, the German Federal Health Agency established the German Commission E to investigate the safety and efficacy of herbal remedies.The commission studied evidence from literature, anecdotal reports, and clinical studies. In response, they developed monographs on over 400 herbs. These writings are now used worldwide as essential references on herbal therapy. The commission also established indications of how an herb is used medicinally and dosage...

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Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Depression and Anxiety

More and more clients are requesting recommendations and referrals from psychotherapistfor complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). These therapies, which range from nutrition to body work, are often done in conjunction medication, rather than as a replacement.

Harvard University researchers and psychologists found that more than half of those reporting anxiety attacks or severe depression used a form of alternative treatment such as herbal remedies, special diets or acupuncture in the past year, while only one-third visited a psychiatrist, psychologist, social worker or physician. With the exception of chronic back or neck pain, depression and anxiety were the conditions that most frequently led people to try alternative treatments, according to researchers.

People with anxiety or depression who are attracted to alternative therapies tend to like self-administered strategies. About 20 percent of the respondents in the Harvard study who used alternative treatments reported visit...

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LIVING WITH ANXIETY: What am I so afraid of ? By: John Newmark, M.S., LMHC

Is it fear or anxiety?  Is there a difference?  Yes, there is a big difference…

In people with anxiety disorders, the brain’s “hard drive” that controls the fear response goes awry.  At the core of this part of the brain is the amygdala, a structure that flags incoming signals as dangerous or worrisome and communicates with other parts of the brain to put the body on alert.


Early life events, especially traumatic ones, can impact this circuitry so that it is oversensitive and sends out alarms too often.  We have to perceive real threats in order to survive, but those with anxiety see threats where there aren't any, perhaps because emotional memories or defective genetics color their perceptions.


Typically, those who suffer from prolonged anxiety experience a range symptoms, including:

•    excessive worry about health, money, family, work, or school—even when there are no signs of trouble
•    &nb...

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IS IT TRUE? ARE YOU CERTAIN? HOW WOULD YOUR LIFE CHANGE IF YOUR BELIEFS CHANGED?

Many of us are victims of our irrational thoughts/beliefs about people and life.  We often believe everything we think.  This causes us tremendous amounts of pain, confusion, depression and anxiety. 

 

I use INQUIRY and replacing Cognitive Distortions that we all have to assist in relieveing pain and suffering.

 

Feel free to write about some of YOUR thoughts/beliefs that are hurting you...

 

 

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