CHARACTER CRUMBLES WHEN COMPROMISED

One morning as I drove to work, I heard a song by “Casting Crowns” titled, “Slow Fade.” The song is about guarding against the little compromises that wear down our integrity. It uses lines from a popular Christian children’s song, “be careful little eyes what you see, be careful little ears what you hear, etc.”  I particularly like the refrain:

 

“It’s a slow fade when you give yourself away. It’s a slow fade when black and white have turned to gray. Thoughts invade, choices are made, there’s a price to be paid When you give yourself away. People never crumble in a day.”

In our society today, it’s becoming harder and harder to nail down what’s right and what’s wrong unless you anchor yourself upon a Rock that never moves. As humans wax more and more cold and rebellious against God, there seems to be no moral certainty. Christians face a relentless onslaught of humanism that says “if it feels good, do it!” and “I am my own god.” But there is only one God, and his sovereignty is eternal, regardless of what popular culture likes to proclaim; and there is a price to be paid when we Christians rebel against God.

Don’t be fooled into thinking that a little compromise won’t have negative consequences for you and your relationship with God. The crumbling involves guilt, lack of peace, and ultimately, shame. So if you’ve let down your guard and begun to accept some of the world’s lies, you can change your mind and recommit yourself to the Lord. He has provided an armor: The helmet of salvation, the sword of the Lord which is the word of God, the shoes of peace, the belt of truth, the breastplate of righteousness, the shield of faith, praying always.

Repent and pray. “And if the world hates you, you know that it hated Me before it hated you. If you were of the world, the world would love its own. Yet because you are not of the world, but I chose you out of the world, therefore the world hates you.” (John 15:18-19) Count it a blessing to be hated by the world yet loved by God!

Susan A. Haberkorn, Ph.D.