How Counseling Can Help Your Child With Self-Care

I love working with kids and families.

I notice sometimes the topic of self-care is focused on adults and not always on kids. Yet, I see kids every day in my office, and we talk about stress. We talk about the following areas that have to do with self-care:

  • The stress of school.
  • Stress from sports and performance.
  • Dealing with the pressure of homework.
  • Trying to fit in with social groups.
  • Stress for academic performance such as test-taking.
  • Making new friends and maintaining current friendships.
  • Dealing with the demands of personal expectations with the expectations of parents.

 

If you are an adult reading this, I want you to think about your childhood. More than likely, you experienced stress as a child. Maybe the stress came from the question of would you be on the starting lineup for the sport you played. Or would your parents be okay with the grade you made?

As a counselor that specializes in working with kids and parents, I want to encourage you to reflect on self-care and stress.

Start with the questions:

  • How does your child deal with self-care?
  • What are the stressors in your child’s life?
  • Is your child aware of the stressors?

Below are self-care practices that you can start practicing today:

  • Deep breathing.
  • Going for a nature walk.
  • Joining a support group.
  • Going to therapy.
  • Trying group therapy.
  • Writing in a journal.
  • Drawing in a journal.
  • Listening to fun music.
  • Taking a break from schoolwork.
  • Taking a break from social media or video games.

Benefits of self-care include:

  • Reduce stress.
  • Improve physical health.
  • Reduce muscle tension and pain in the body.
  • Fewer headaches.
  • Increase self-esteem.
  • A healthy relationship with food.
  • Increase self-worth.
  • Healthy sleep.
  • Increase self-confidence.
  • Better decision-making.
  • Increase inability to adapt to change.

 

Are you ready to start counseling?

Call the counseling office at 336-663-6570 or email [email protected].

 

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