Therapist Blogs

 

Wormhole Named Desire – YouTube - #11

18. Reflection:
Think of a time when someone said, “You’re too ______________”.
Think of the person pointing a finger and the recipient of the accusation.
• What was going on for each?
• What would have been needed for understanding?

Wormhole Named Desire (YouTube):
“Lady Humpty Meets Humpty Guy”
“A resilient Humpty experiences the light and warmth of sunny times and recognizes pain of horror in the shadows.”

Comment:
The essence of survival is that a person derives pleasure and hope from good things and at the same time is especially sensitive to pain. The survivor has an early warning system that picks up pain signals before others (who are less vulnerable). It is like a person whose hand was seriously burned. While healing, when the hand is near warmth it hurts. Someone else will just feel warmth.

 

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Wormhole Named Desire – YouTube - #10

17. Reflection:
Think of a time you were mystified by someone’s behavior (or by your own)?
• What did you do?
• Looking ahead, were a similar situation to occur, what else could be done?

Wormhole Named Desire (YouTube):
“The Shroud” represents that “The Cave” is not a place. It is constrained consciousness.
“Whenever Humpty ventures aboveground, a “Shroud” wraps Humpty’s senses causing reactions that miss the mark mystifying anyone who was never shattered.”

Comment:
“Ventures aboveground” means that “constrained consciousness” is not set in stone. It comes and goes. Clear perception can alternate with clouded senses (rapidly or the swing can take more time to happen).


The behavior (that flows from the swinging awareness) confuses children, challenges adults, and mystifies the person (who alternately copes well and “misses the mark”). An adult (whose own upbringing was relatively uneve...

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Wormhole Named Desire – YouTube - #9

16. Reflection:
• What comment have you heard that indicates avoidance or a closed mind as a form of self-protection?
• Do you have an example of a short-sighted viewpoint that takes a lesson learned in the past and misapplies it to a present situation?

Wormhole Named Desire (YouTube):
“Experience for a Cave Dweller is obscured by Shadows cast by past horrors and projected by current events. Past and present combine to confirm darkness and constraint.”

Comment:
The term “shell shock” was first used in World War I. “Battle fatigue” was used in World War II. Now we use the term “Post Traumatic Stress” and understand that it applies to other severely disturbing life experiences. A person with lasting effects from trauma often has “triggers” for overreaction; and might have tried many ways to mitigate them.

 

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Wormhole Named Desire - YouTube - #1 - Journey from Survival of Trauma to Freedom of Love

2. Reflection: How can you tell that the past is “woven” into a present experience?

Wormhole: Albert Einstein and Nathan Rosen realized that general relativity allows the existence of “bridges,” originally called Einstein-Rosen bridges but now known as wormholes. These space-time tubes act as shortcuts connecting distant regions of space-time.

Source: “Stephen Hawking’s Universe”, http://www.pbs.org/wnet/hawking/strange/html/wormhole.html

Here, Wormhole represents a connection between past and present. The “travel” is not necessarily perceived. Past and present “light” is indistinguishable. “Light” is a metaphor, rather than something visual. It is as if experience is a fabric; and past and present are “woven” into it.

3. Reflection: What present day desire has its roots in past experience(s)?

Comment:
“A Streetcar Named Desire”, by Tennessee Williams, is about a “woman who invents ...

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Wormhole Named Desire - YouTube - #2

4. Reflection:

What is an example of slipping into a viewpoint that is not useful in a present circumstance?

Comment:
“Alice's Adventures in Wonderland” (1865) and “Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There” (1871) by Lewis Carroll, provide useful images. The wormhole can be envisioned as a mirror through which we enter and return, or a rabbit hole into which we fall.

5. Reflection:

What childhood memory of yours brings a good feeling to you?

Comment:
“Humpty Dumpty sat on the wall”. It is easy to imagine that the character is like a child who is having a good time.

 

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Wormhole Named Desire - YouTube - #5

9. Reflection:
What are sources of resilience for you?

Wormhole Named Desire (YouTube):
“A Habit Forms: Put Self Back Together”

Comment:
“All of the king’s horses and all of the king’s men could put Humpty together again”, so goes the nursery rhyme.

Common experience tells us that a person can survive severe difficulties. It is also true that seemingly mild difficulties can produce disaster for some individuals.

Survivors keep moving forward with support at crucial moments, the good fortune of ongoing resources and a mysterious resonance that is expressed by spiritual traditions. Moving forward reveals a pattern of “picking up the pieces when things fall apart” and “getting back up on the horse again”. This is known as resilience.

10. Reflection:
What is an example of a habit (of yours or someone you know) that shows recurring “blurred vision”?

Wormhole Named Desire (YouTube):
“Hobbled together, it is possib...

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Wormhole Named Desire - YouTube - #6

11. Reflection:
What continues to influence you, long past its occurrence?

Wormhole Named Desire (YouTube):
“The self-cobbled Humpty hobbles between The Above and The Below like a nomad.”

Comment:
Above symbolizes “Present Reality” and Below means “Lasting Effects of the Past”. The ongoing influence of things that have happened is represented by the phrase “downstream results”. For example, early childhood education is connected to long-term success in life.

12. Reflection:
Think of a time when you struggled to hold back a reaction that would have provoked rejection. What was difficult for you?

Wormhole Named Desire (YouTube):
“At any moment, a rabbit hole into The Cave appears. Falling into it is so very easy.”

Comment:
Rabbit Hole and Wormhole have the same meaning. There is an instantaneous connection to the effects of past events. This can be seen when someone makes a “mountain out of a molehill”. Less obvious, ...

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Wormhole Named Desire - YouTube - #7

13. Reflection:
How have you seen beliefs be a source of strength and when have they inhibited successful adaptation?

Wormhole Named Desire (YouTube):
The Cave is where beliefs filter experience and provide comfort like a blanket that keeps out the cold, like a hug that says love and security, like chains in a dungeon.”

Comment:
Beliefs provide hope through tough times, guide us through ethical dilemmas, and shield us from being overwhelmed. Yet, beliefs can inhibit learning needed for successful adaptation to big changes.

Easter Island once had a society that believed good fortune was granted by gods. Overpopulation changed the ecology, because too many palm trees were destroyed. So the people cut down more palm trees as part of their ritual offering to the gods. The ecology collapsed and the people vanished.

14. Reflection:
How do you gain perspective and change the meaning that you give to an experience?

Wormhole Named Desire (YouTube):
“In The Cave, beliefs tie d...

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Wormhole Named Desire - YouTube - #8

15. Reflection:
When do distorted accounts of events or misguided actions indicate the presence of a Wormhole?

Wormhole Named Desire (YouTube):
“Perverse judgments drive destructive actions.”

Comment:
From the Latin word for “turned around”, “perverse” can signify the “wrong way”. If “wrong way” is constant, the person could be a sociopath who does not care about the pain cause by actions. But, when a person goes back-and-forth, usually positive and sometimes destructive, it could indicate that a Wormhole is active. When a child is “just being a kid” and the adult reaction is overly punitive or routinely critical, the adult reaction is perverse.

 

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Kuwait Psychology: Client Bill of Rights

1. Clients have the right to avoid exploitation by those who brazenly adopt misleading titles, such as "doctor", "supervising psychologist", "registered psychologist", "counseling psychologist", "psychiatrist" and so on.

2. Clients have the right to ask whether their therapist has a valid doctoral degree from a regionally accredited university or has purchased their degree online from a diploma mill. Clients have the right to know that some diploma mill degree holders have achieved celebrity-like status through misleading advertising campaigns, the extensive use of phony titles, and other forms of self-promotion like becoming the "founders" of patient referral networks disguised as professional organizations.

3. Clients have the right to suspect the veracity of a doctoral degree in psychology which is suddenly acquired without ever having left Kuwait. Clients have the right to know that only a diploma mill degree can be acquired overnight since it is based on...

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